A Dog by Another Name

sausages image

We sometimes think that ‘hot dogs’ and ‘brats (bratwursts)’ and ‘sausages’’ are all different cuts of meat. They all look similar – long tubes stuffed with meat. I thought you might be interested in knowing about some of the sausages. All can be boiled (except breakfast sausage which can be fried or bulk sausage), broiled or grilled and topped with whatever tastes best to you. Enjoy!

Sausage Definitions

Pork Sausage:

A typical sausage consists of ground meat that’s combined with fat, flavorings, and preservatives, and then stuffed into a casing and twisted at intervals to make links.  Pork is most commonly used, but butchers also use beef, lamb, veal, turkey, chicken, or game, and some also use fillers like oatmeal and rice to stretch the meat a bit. Casings vary too–in addition to intestines or artificial casings, butchers sometimes use stomachs, feet, skins, or they do away with casings altogether and sell the sausage in bulk.  After assembling a sausage, a butcher can either sell it as fresh sausage, or else cure, dry, or precook it in some way.

Italian Sausage:

This is a pork sausage that’s often added to pasta sauces. Varieties include sweet Italian sausage = mild Italian sausage, which is flavored with garlic and fennel seed, and hot Italian sausage, which also has a shake or two of crushed chili peppers.  It’s sold either as links or in bulk.  Cook thoroughly before serving.

Bratwurst:

This is made with pork and sometimes veal, and seasoned with subtle spices.  It usually needs to be cooked before eating, though some markets carry precooked bratwurst. Raw rats are often grayish-white in color before cooking.

Polish Kielbasa:

This is made with pork and sometimes veal, and seasoned with subtle spices.   It usually needs to be cooked before eating, though some markets carry precooked bratwurst.

Boudin:

A highly seasoned link sausage of pork, pork liver, and rice that is a typical element of Louisiana Creole cuisine.

  

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